To have another language is to possess a second soul.
Charlemagne

05 March 2015

CREATIVE SCULPTURES AROUND THE WORLD

Every city that you visit has its own unique sculptures and statues, but some really make you look twice.
There are many sculptures and statues (both new and old) currently provoking conversation and intrigue.
Watch the presentation and think of a name for each sculpture.




Pictures from  http://www.earthporm.com/25-creative-sculptures-statues-around-world/

1. FEMINITY II . GIANT SHOE HEEL (GRANATULA DE CALATRAVA. SPAIN)

from  http://www.enricpla.blogspot.com.es/
This work by Enric Pla Montferrer called Femininity II was installed in 2008 in the town of Granátula of Calatrava (Ciudad Real) as part of Laruta Tourist-Film Pedro Almodóvar, who complete three other works also winners of the international competition held for this purpose and located Calzada de Calatrava, Almagro and Puertollano. The sculpture depicts a high heel shoe of 5 m long and 3 m high made of steel.



 






 
2. THE MUSTANGS OF LAS COLINAS
www.robertglenbronzes.com
It is a realistic bronze sculpture of nine wild mustangs galloping across a granite stream. Tourists from around the world come to view the impressive, larger-than-life depiction that serves as the centerpiece of Williams Square, a stark, pink granite plaza in the Las Colinas Urban Center (Texas, USA).
Adjacent to the sculpture, in the East Tower of Williams Square Plaza, is the Mustangs of Las Colinas Museum. In the museum, visitors learn  the story of the eight years of work African wildlife artist Robert Glen invested in creating the Mustangs.

3.  THE  SHOES ON THE DANUBE BANK  ( BUDAPEST, HUNGARY)

This memorial in Budapest created by Can Togay & Gyula Pauer memorializes the Jews killed by the fascist Arrow Cross during World War II. The shoes symbolize the victims who were forced to take off their shoes before being shot at the water’s edge.

 





















4. THE MONUMENT OF AN ANONYMOUS PASSERBY (POLAND)

This statue signifies all of the souls lost, imprisoned, or otherwise harmed by the oppressive Communist regime that existed in Poland for many years. The monument symbolizes the enslavement of people by communism.


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